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Diamond Fields

In the Early 1870s, one of the greatest diamond rushes began in South Africa after the discovery of a valuable diamond on the Orange River. This collection consists of five items that represent some of the earliest publications describing the diamond fields of South Africa. Published between 1870 and 1917, this collection of monographs, essays, and pamphlets reflect the excitement generated by one of the greatest mineral discoveries of the late 19th century.

Equality of Educational Opportunity

This report is submitted in response to Section 402 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964:

SEC. 402. The Commissioner shall conduct a survey and make a report to the President and the Congress, within two years of the enactment of this title, concerning the lack of availability of equal educational opportunities for individuals by reason of race, color, religion, or national origin in public educational institutions at all levels in the United States, its territories and possessions, and the District of Columbia.

US Food Conservation Notes

The U.S. Food Administration was established by Executive Order 2679-A (August 10, 1917). President Wilson appointed Herbert Hoover as its administrator. Hoover realized that conservation was the only way to quickly increase food stocks and correctly believed that people would voluntarily conserve food to help the war effort. Through promotions such as Meatless Mondays and Wheat-less Wednesdays, the agency was able to reduce domestic food consumption by 15% and supply US and allied forces.

USDA Periodicals

This collection contains USDA Periodicals titled, The Cotton Situation (1947-1948), The Farm Income Situation (1946-1955), The Fruit Situation (1946-1949), The Marketing and Transportation Situation (1947-1948), and The Market Reporter (1920-1921).

WPA Week in National Defense

Issued in 1941, The WPA Week in National Defense presented brief news items concerning the Work Projects Administration’s activities throughout the United States. Formerly the Works Progress Administration, this agency provided jobs in construction, adult education, writing, and art. The WPA Week described products of this work leading up to the second World War. The circulars cover subjects such as the building of armories and air bases, mosquito control at military camps, renovation of water and natural gas supply systems, mural painting, and recreation.